5 Solutions for Plantar Fasciitis Pain

Heel Pain

Plantar fasciitis pain typically occurs if the stringy band that connects your heel to your toes is damaged. Approximately half of Americans suffer from heel and foot pain, and it is often attributed to plantar fasciitis. Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists can help you get past that awful pain with these five solutions:

 

  1. Ice it. Because the pain is caused by inflammation of your ligament, applying ice is a perfect first line of defense to decrease the swelling. Resting is another important way to promote healing, so be sure to get off your feet every chance you can and wrap an ice pack in a towel and carefully apply it directly to the bottom of your foot.

 

  1. Work out the pain. Physical therapy goes a long way in reducing your pain. Exercises and stretches that stabilize and strengthen the muscles in your ankle and foot help relieve your symptoms and can keep plantar fasciitis from developing again. 

 

  1. Medicate it. When your pain is at its worst, you can reach for some quick relief in the form of over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as Advil and Motrin, or Aleve, among others. If taken in moderation, these medications can help reduce the swelling that typically accompanies plantar fasciitis.

 

  1. Splint it. One of the most effective treatments for your plantar fasciitis takes place in the middle of the night. Putting on a tension splint when sleeping has been clinically proven to get you through the worst of your pain and cure your condition after approximately 12 weeks. 

 

  1. Inject it. If you’ve tried these conservative approaches and still can’t seem to get pain relief, we may suggest corticosteroid injections.

 

In some more extreme cases, surgery may be recommended to treat your plantar fasciitis.

If you’ve been experiencing sharp pain in your heel and foot and are finally ready to get relief, it’s time to contact the office of Dr. Hubert Lee at CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists at (425) 455-0936 to book your visit or schedule an appointment online

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Dr. Hubert Lee

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